“Afterimage” by Victoria DeBlassie

THE EXHIBITION:

Victoria DeBlassie’s exhibition Afterimage, at SRISA project space, concerns the afterimage or, the positive imprint or negative impression that is observed when looking away from an original image, is an experience that is just as much about how we perceive the world through our bodies and temporal succession as it is about absence and presence, about what we do and don’t perceive at any given moment. It simultaneously confirms and questions the phenomenological certainty of our reality.

Afterimage—part of the Gestalt of a Crate series— is a three-room installation and a three-dimensional afterimage immersion made from various color-coordinated plastic crates varying according to each room. When moving through the space initially, white, i.e. the absence of color, is the first immersion, followed by a submersion into striking vibrant colors, proceeded by the final room which is predominantly black, viz. the concentration of all color, and like a negative afterimage this process is reversed upon leaving the installation. This passage through space enables the viewer to intensely experience how stimuli are perceived before and after leaving each room and how the afterimage of color or any stimulus on different colors or different stimuli—whether it is white on color, various colors on black and vise-versa—is seen and felt while traversing each specific color field. Reflecting on the absence and presence of each perceptual encounter, and how the visual compensation of trying to comprehend our surroundings as well as how we move through space and time, this ‘procession’ through color fields is meant to draw attention to being aware of our bodies and our relationship to the world and how our bodies function as interpreters of the given realities we face.

As in the initial Gestalt of a Crate installation, crates are used as a material because there is an inherent connection to the earth as they were once containers of produce, and since they are recycled, there is also an intrinsic connection to ecological responsibility. With the conceptual implications of the container and how bodies, buildings and the earth itself are containers of life in conjunction with the way they are altered and put together in the Afterimage installation, the work aims to create a corporeal awareness to our impact on the environment and to promote a shift in cultural priorities, elevating fundamental needs and creative reuse of materials instead of wasteful excess.

Victoria DeBlassie’s exhibition Afterimage, at SRISA project space, concerns the afterimage or, the positive imprint or negative impression that is observed when looking away from an original image, is an experience that is just as much about how we perceive the world through our bodies and temporal succession as it is about absence and presence, about what we do and don’t perceive at any given moment. It simultaneously confirms and questions the phenomenological certainty of our reality.

Afterimage—part of the Gestalt of a Crate series— is a three-room installation and a three-dimensional afterimage immersion made from various color-coordinated plastic crates varying according to each room. When moving through the space initially, white, i.e. the absence of color, is the first immersion, followed by a submersion into striking vibrant colors, proceeded by the final room which is predominantly black, viz. the concentration of all color, and like a negative afterimage this process is reversed upon leaving the installation. This passage through space enables the viewer to intensely experience how stimuli are perceived before and after leaving each room and how the afterimage of color or any stimulus on different colors or different stimuli—whether it is white on color, various colors on black and vise-versa—is seen and felt while traversing each specific color field. Reflecting on the absence and presence of each perceptual encounter, and how the visual compensation of trying to comprehend our surroundings as well as how we move through space and time, this ‘procession’ through color fields is meant to draw attention to being aware of our bodies and our relationship to the world and how our bodies function as interpreters of the given realities we face.

As in the initial Gestalt of a Crate installation, crates are used as a material because there is an inherent connection to the earth as they were once containers of produce, and since they are recycled, there is also an intrinsic connection to ecological responsibility. With the conceptual implications of the container and how bodies, buildings and the earth itself are containers of life in conjunction with the way they are altered and put together in the Afterimage installation, the work aims to create a corporeal awareness to our impact on the environment and to promote a shift in cultural priorities, elevating fundamental needs and creative reuse of materials instead of wasteful excess.

THE ARTIST:

Victoria DeBlassie is an artist who was born and raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DeBlassie uses discarded objects and materials to create art work that suggests change and development overtime. Using the refuse’s innate history, form, and function as a point of departure, she reformulates the acquired matter’s identity, sometimes inviting social interactions from the reworked materials. Selected recent works include Encyclopedia Oracle wherein an encyclopedia Britannica set from the artist’s birth year found in front of her apartment when she first moved to San Francisco became a socially engaging divination wheel, making her chance encounter other people’s synchronistic event; in Accumulated Matter an orange at a local farmers’ market, perfectly two colors, initiates revisiting the use of fruit peels to deepen a material and spatial exploration through the collection of post-consumed orange peels from local juice bars.

DeBlassie received her BFA from the University of New Mexico in 2009 and MFA at the California College of the Arts in 2011. Recently, she was awarded a Fulbright Full Grant for Italy for the 2012-2013 academic year. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally including the de Young Museum and Make Hang Gallery in San Francisco, CA, [AC]2 Gallery in Albuquerque, NM, and the Diocesan Museum in Pienza, Italy.

EXHIBITION OPENING:

EXHIBITION DETAILS:

OPENING:

October 24, h. 6.30 pm

DATES:

October 24 - November 18 2017
mon-fri 10:00 am – 9:00 pm - free entrance

SPACE:

ADDRESS:

Santa Reparata International School of Art
Via Santa Reparata 19r, 50129 Firenze

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